Wednesday, May 19, 2021

How Much Is Too Much Part 2: Fully Installing Concepts

    This is the second installment on my series on How Much is Too Much? Today I want to talk to you about what it means to "fully install" a concept. One of the biggest issues we have as offensive coordinators is that we install a bunch of concepts, but we don't "fully" install them. We end up with a lot of play calls that are what we would say are good calls, but due to a lack of execution, they become bad calls. They aren't going to work against a particular defensive look, and we have limited answers in place.  Bad play calls stall drives and lead to multiple three and outs. I have had plenty of these in my career, and many stem from trying to do too much. 

A fully installed concept has the following 7 components

1. The concept base install

2. Blocking rules installed against each front you will see

3. Perimeter Blocking Rules and adjustments

4 Complementary Plays to take advantage of defensive answers

5. Play Action Component to take advantage of secondary support on runs

6. Route adjustments that can be made to attack coverage on passes

7. Reverse or trick play using the action of the original play 

    A full install is far beyond knowing the rules of a play, and your assignment. A full install of a play means that you can install that play, run it versus any front or coverage, and you have answers to the different adjustments defenses will make. When you have a concept fully installed, your players know how to adjust on the fly. They can change their path, their route, or their footwork. The back can adjust his path. The QB can adjust his read. Your players can make sight adjustments, and the coaches have complementary concepts that take advantage of defensive answers. You have to have answers for the answers of the defense.

    Let's look at midline option when installed fully. When midline is full installed, we could run it against any front and any blitz. We had built in answers to the adjustments defenses made. We had if/thens built into the play. We had easy in-game adjustments that allowed us to handle different things the defense might do. Our kids could sight adjust based on how the defense lined up. We were able to successfully run the play anywhere on the field, against every opponent we faced, and we were able to have consistency. It wasn't a feast or famine concept. We had complementary tags that helped provide us answers to defensive answers. 

    If they lined up in two high safeties, our receivers did one thing with their blocking. If we got 1 high safety, our receivers made an adjustment. Our playside guard changed his path based on the alignment of the read key and the defensive front. Our tackle and tight end would adjust their blocking based on whether there was a down guy in the C gap. 

    From the box, I could see what the defense was doing to try to stop midline. We typically saw three things defenses would do. First, they would scrape exchange with the 3 technique and the Mike backer. Second, they would have the Sam fall-in on the quarterback. Third, they would have the backside inside linebacker playing fast over the top to take the dive. We needed answers to those three adjustments. If they reduced their front, then we had ways to answer that as well. 

    We had complementary tags to take advantage of their adjustments. If they scrape exchanged, we would run our give scheme. If the Sam fell in on the QB, we would run mid triple which we tagged Mid Pitch. If the Will was fast over the top, we would run follow opposite. If the 3 tech was fast upfield, we would trap him. Below is an example of midline with complements. 



    We also had four play action concepts we ran off midline option to take advantage of secondary adjustments. If the Mike was playing triggering fast, we would throw a pop to the TE. If the safety was screaming downhill, we would run a post. If the corner was playing pitch, we ran verticals. We also ran the TE on an arrow off midline action if the Sam was squatting. 

    From there, we added window dressing. We used formations and motions to change the structure of the defense. We wanted to put them in situations where we changed their assignments. We used motion to add a blocker, improve our angle, remove a defender, or to cause eye discipline issues within the defense. 

    Everything we did was systematic. We had a systematic approach to installing midline, as well as each concept within our offense. This gave our players a certain comfort in knowing they could make adjustments, and confidence in knowing we would always put them in a position to be successful. They could play fast and with confidence.

    As we evolved away from traditional option concepts, we moved our identity run to the inside zone concept. When we installed inside zone, we also installed complements. Our first install was inside zone read with built in quick game concepts. This gave us three plays in one. We had rules for our receivers that were simple. Our QB could throw the quick game concept based on alignment. This gave us quick, high percentage throws to the perimeter. If we didn't like the throw, we executed the run. In the figure below we would throw the fast screen to the twins side because we had numbers. 


    The first answer we added was to account for a squeeze scrape on the read side. The end would take the running back, and the backer would squeeze We would flex our Y, and bring him across the formation to give us a split zone action. We first installed kick. This told our Y to kick the read key. What this did was give us an opportunity to dictate who carried the ball. If our running back was our best player, the defense would try to take him away. By kicking the read key we had an answer. 

    If we wanted our QB to be the ball carrier against a squeeze scrape, we would tag slice. This told the Y to cross the formation and bypass the read key. He would then account for the scraping linebacker. This become a triple option concept, because the QB could throw the fast screen after he pulled based on the force player. If the SS attacked the QB, he would flip the ball out to the #1 WR who we were blocking for. 

    To change the presentation on our split zone, we had a tag that put the Y on the read side inside backer. The tackle would now gap step and hinge on the end, and the Y would block the inside backer. We wanted this to be an inside out block if possible. 


    We had a total of 5 tags off inside zone, and then had 3 post snap RPO's we would run. This gave us the ability to always have an answer. We felt like we always had an answer to what the defense wanted to do. We could change personnel, and keep the structure of the play identical regardless of personnel group. 

    Because we fully installed each concept, we didn't have to install as many concepts. We had answers built-in, eliminating the need to have a bunch of additional additional plays. Our playbook was condensed because we because we didn't need a different play to attack different defensive looks. We had our base concepts and complements. 

    This went hand in hand with our pass game. We loved to run the curl flat concept. The curl-flat concept is a great cover 3 beater, but it isn't as good against Cover 2. What we did was sight adjusted the curl route when we faced a cover 2 look. Instead of running a post curl, our #1 receiver pushed vertical attacking the outside shoulder of the corner, and worked a 14 to 12 hole route. When we ran the curl concept, the hook player kept getting into the window of the curl. Since we are reading the flat defender, it simplified things for our QB to read the corner, who is flat defender in cover 2. 


    Instead of installing a new concept, you can install simple route adjustments based on coverage. This allowed us to keep things simple for our quarterback and our receivers. We didn't have to add a bunch of new concepts that we weren't going to be good at running. 

    With the pass game, I like to install in families. Installing concepts in families helps your QB and receivers to be on the same page with reads, and each concept in a particular family can relate to each other. Your quarterback and receivers will process faster, and be able to better handle in game adjustments. 

    What happened over the years, is that I got away from answers and installed more concepts to be the answers. This is something we all need to consider. Do I want to install more concepts and be less detailed with each one, or do I want to install less concepts, and be more detailed with each one? When you have a concept that remains consistent, but you change the presentation for the defense, you get the benefit of installing a new concept without the investment a new concept requires. 

    As I write this, I look back at how many times I allowed our playbook to grow too large. I let it get to a point where kids were not able to play fast, and coaches were going to struggle to make adjustments. I sometimes struggled as a play caller because our menu was too big. When your menu gets too big, you aren't going to be as decisive. Perhaps the most important key to being an effective play caller is decisiveness. 

    How much better can you play if your players know what to do, and how to adjust? How much better will you be as a a play caller if you know exactly what to call based on how the defense is defending certain concepts? I am not telling you to be a minimalist, but I believe to be effective you have to keep your offense from expanding to the point where you can't fully install each concept. 

    As you build your offense for the upcoming season, I would suggest listing each run concept and pass concept you plan on running. For each concept, list the problems you will face from defenses. Then list your tags and complements to solve those problems. For each run, you should have complements to solve front adjustments, and play action passes to take advantage of aggressive secondary play. Finally, what trick plays will you run? You don't necessarily need a trick or gadget play off every concept, but you should have a trick play off your identity concept, and one other concept you run frequently. 

    When you list your pass game, draw up your concept versus split safety coverage, middle closed coverage, and man coverage. Then draw your route adjustments to each coverage. List what answers the defense will have. Then, come up with your tags for each concept that will take advantage of that defensive adjustment. 

    Installing too much can be a huge hindrance to offensive success. I would argue that having too much installed is worse than having too little installed. 

    To help you to be more targeted with your game planning, I came up with a set of game planning documents that we use. These documents helped us to be more targeted with our preparation, while saving us time on the weekend because we were more focused. I made these available to coaches a couple years ago, and every coach that uses them has found tremendous benefit! 

    These documents are fully editable and customizable to be tailored to your exact needs. Everything from wrist band templates, to scouting reports, to call sheets, to practice plans, and much more are included. State champions from more than a dozen states use these documents, and each one tells me they were a game changer. Click this link to order and download! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/AndN/  You will be able to begin to prepare for next season right now! 


    I know that these documents will make a huge difference for your program, the same way they made a difference for so many others. If you are not an OC or head coach yet, you should still download these and begin to put together simulated game plans so you are ready for that big moment! 

    I don't want to leave out your defensive coordinator. When I was a DC, I had several documents I used that helped us to be more prepared, and ultimately, win more games! We posted 6 shutouts, and a big part of that was using these documents! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/AY1u/

    For your special teams coordinator, I have a complete special teams install package, that includes everything from drill tape, to game film, to playbooks, to teaching presentations! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/tJwz/

    I would also invite you to check out my CoachTube courses! I have courses available that will help you be more explosive on offense! https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint

And finally, I stepped out of my comfort zone this year and wrote a book called Finding Faith. It will give you insight into your spiritual walk, and give you some thoughts that can help you grow as a coach, father, and husband. It is available as a paperback on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Finding-Faith-Discovering-Powerful-Through/dp/B08P3PC86L/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=






Tuesday, May 18, 2021

How Much Is Too Much? 5 Negatives When You Install To Much

How much is too much? This is the age old question of offensive coordinators everywhere. At what point do we have too much installed? Why does this even matter? Is there such a thing as too much?

    The first thing I will say is that I never once thought we had too little installed. There never was a season where I said, man, we didn't have enough in our system. There have, however, been several seasons where we felt we had too much installed. And often, it showed on the field. 

When you have too much installed, there are 5 things that you will find. 

1. You never get good at anything

2. Your players can't execute at a high level

3. Your coaches struggle to troubleshoot during games

4. It becomes harder to call plays, especially the right plays

5. You don't have an identity. 

    When you have too much installed, it is hard to be good at anything. You will find that you become really good at being average. How many times have you called the perfect play, only to have a kid bust on assignments? This is going to happen at times, but it is going to happen far more often when you have too much installed. 

    I equate installation to a jar full of sand. Once that jar gets full, you put the lid on. You can't add any more sand because there isn't any room. When you add some more sand to the jar, you can't put the lid back on. If you do get the lid on, you risk the jar breaking. How many times have you overloaded your players to the point they can't execute? Everything you install has to be practiced. It has to be rehearsed. You have to be able to run it against any front. The more things you try to do, the less time you have to practice each thing. 

    Another big issue that comes up is troubleshooting. When you have too many plays in your playbook it makes it really difficult to troubleshoot. Your guys come to the sideline after a series, only to be overloaded with information. They are not going to be able to process that information.  Your kids won't be able to make adjustments on the fly. If I am a receiver who has to adjust my blocking based on who the force guy is, I have to be able to determine if this is one high or two high. I have to know based on depth, eyes, and leverage if the corner is a force guy, or a deep zone dropper, or playing man. The more I have to remember, the harder it is going to be for me to make an adjustment and block the right guy. It is why we have receivers blocking no one. They are unsure. This happens all the time in games. Or, a guy will run the wrong route. An offensive lineman will step with the wrong foot. Having too much creates confusion and makes it harder to troubleshoot. 

    The hardest thing to do as a play caller is choose the right play to call when you have too much installed. You are looking at your call sheet, and it is just filled with information. There are really great things on your call sheet, and you can't pick what to call. Or, you can't find something you are looking for. You become indecisive. When you are indecisive you are not going to be as effective as a play caller. If you are targeted in your preparation, you will find yourself being a better play caller. 

    What is your identity? You have to have an identity concept if you are gong to be successful. What is the one play that you can run in your sleep when you need a first down? What is the one thing people must be able to stop if they are going to beat you? That doesn't mean you aren't good at other things, but knowing your identity and identity concept are vital for you to be explosive on offense. Your kids also feed into your identity. When you don't know your identity, they won't know your identity. 

    This is the big challenge coaches face each season, and each game week. How much is too much? It is going to be different for each team. What works for one team may not work for another. Some teams have a higher football aptitude. When a backup is in the game, your call sheet might be limited even further. The less they have to learn, the more effective they will be able to be. 

    As you prepare for the upcoming season, ask yourself these three questions.

1. What is our identity? 

2. Who is your dude, or who are your dudes?

3. How much can your kids handle mentally? 

    Once you answer these three questions, you then begin to build your system. You list your base formations, motions, runs, and passes. What are your complementary plays? What are your trick plays? Then, build your install schedule. As you install, begin to eliminate and adjust. If you get time in the spring and/or summer to install, you can gauge what your team can handle. 

    One very important thing to understand is that just because you can draw it on the board, doesn't mean kids can execute it on the field. Have this in mind as you begin to develop your offensive package. 

    And finally, who are your guys? Who are the dudes who you need to get the ball to? Make sure as you build your game plan each week and plan for the season, that you have ways to get your best guys quality touches. 

    To help you to be more targeted with your game planning, I came up with a set of game planning documents that we use. These documents helped us to be more targeted with our preparation, while saving us time on the weekend because we were more focused. I made these available to coaches a couple years ago, and every coach that uses them has found tremendous benefit! 

    These documents are fully editable and customizable to be tailored to your exact needs. Everything from wrist band templates, to scouting reports, to call sheets, to practice plans, and much more are included. State champions from more than a dozen states use these documents, and each one tells me they were a game changer. Click this link to order and download! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/AndN/  You will be able to begin to prepare for next season right now! 


    I know that these documents will make a huge difference for your program, the same way they made a difference for so many others. If you are not an OC or head coach yet, you should still download these and begin to put together simulated game plans so you are ready for that big moment! 

    I don't want to leave out your defensive coordinator. When I was a DC, I had several documents I used that helped us to be more prepared, and ultimately, win more games! We posted 6 shutouts, and a big part of that was using these documents! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/AY1u/

    For your special teams coordinator, I have a complete special teams install package, that includes everything from drill tape, to game film, to playbooks, to teaching presentations! https://coachvint.sellfy.store/p/tJwz/

    I would also invite you to check out my CoachTube courses! I have courses available that will help you be more explosive on offense! https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint

And finally, I stepped out of my comfort zone this year and wrote a book called Finding Faith. It will give you insight into your spiritual walk, and give you some thoughts that can help you grow as a coach, father, and husband. It is available as a paperback on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Finding-Faith-Discovering-Powerful-Through/dp/B08P3PC86L/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=



Wednesday, May 12, 2021

It's Camp Season!

Camp season is upon us, as colleges across the country will be hosting opportunities for student athletes to get exposure this summer. There are one day camps, three day camps, elite camps, satellite camps, and more. During this time of year I get bombarded with questions about camps from prospects and parents. 

First: Camps Are A Time For Evaluation
    Camps give college coaches a chance to do three things. First, they get to watch you move in person. They get to see you live and watch you perform. They see first hand your athleticism. They see your ability to change direction. The watch your footwork, your speed, quickness, and explosiveness. Do you have good hip flexibility? They are also going to see if you can make plays against elite competition. 
    Next, they are going to see how coachable you are. They get a chance to work with you through drills, and see how well you respond to coaching. Do you listen when you are given instruction? Do you listen when other players are getting instruction? Do you take reps, or do you hang in the back of the line? Do you hustle around? 
    Finally, they get to see if you pass the eye test. Are you big enough to play there? Are you really the height you say you are? Do you really weigh what you say you weigh? Do you have long arms? 
    Ultimately, they are going to determine if you will add value to their program. Will you help them win more games? Can they see you elevating their program? 

Next: A Camp Invite is NOT an Offer
    The University of Texas has come through your door to talk to your high school coach. They leave several camp brochures, and tell the coach they want to see some guys at camp. A Graduate assistant sends you a DM inviting you to camp. You get excited because Texas is your dream school. Up until this point they have not talked to you one time.  You were backup on varsity, and are undersized for your position. You sign up for the camp, and send the coach a link to your film. You go to camp, have the best day of your athletic career, and never hear from them again. This scenario gets played out thousands of times each year.
    Getting invited to camp does not mean a school is recruiting you. Question: Why would a college invite guys to camp that they aren't interested in recruiting? Great question. The answer is that they want a good turnout. They want the energy. You might think they would only want the guys they are recruiting. But that is really a non issue. You see, when they finish stretching and break into positions, athletes will then be grouped by ability. If you are a guy the school is recruiting, you will be grouped with the best players. You will be coached by the position coach. The guys who aren't being recruited will be grouped with the lesser talented players. They will be coached by a "guest" coach. This might be a Division II or Division 3 Coach, or a coach from outside who is hired to work the camp. This isn't a bad thing, and gives you an opportunity to be evaluated by a coach you might be able to play for.  
    Understand that when that college coach invites you to camp, he may just be looking for a guy to fill a spot. If the school hasn't talked to you at all before inviting you to camp, they probably aren't interested in evaluating you at camp. They want you at camp to increase the numbers. That doesn't mean you are a bad player, it simply means you aren't going to get an evaluation from the host school. 

Focus On Schools Where You Can Play
    You want to focus on attending camps at schools where you can play. If a school is actively recruiting you, their camp would benefit you. If a school does not know who you are, you are probably going to be a donation. Everyone wants to go to Alabama, or Oklahoma, or Ohio State, or some other major FBS Power 5 School. But realistically, if those schools haven't talked to you before camp, you are not going to come out of camp with an offer. Here are a couple simple things you can do to determine if you can play at the school: 
    Look at their roster. Are you comparable to the height and weight of the players they are recruiting? Do you have the grades and test score it would take to be admitted into school? Do you have similar statistics in high school to the guys they are recruiting, and are on their roster? This is a quick way to know if you even have a shot at being recruited by a school. 
    It is very rare that a player who is not being recruited walks into an FBS camp and earns an offer. While I say it is rare, it can happen. But it happens because you do something that "wows" the coaches. Several years ago I was at a camp at an FBS school, and a linebacker from a tiny high school showed up. He had no offers. The coaches tested 40's at the start of the camp, and he ran a 4.4. That got him some attention. He then did really well in every drill. When it came time for 1-on-1's, he covered running backs and tight ends like a blanket. He left camp with an offer. His 40 time became a difference maker. He did something that wowed the coaches. 

 Have A Camp Plan
    If you want to make the most of camp season, you have to have a plan. You don't want to go to camps to be a donation. You want to go to camp to increase your chances of earning a scholarship. You aren't going to be able to attend camps every day during the summer, nor do you want to. You want to make sure you are attending workouts with your own team, and you don't want to burn yourself out and risk injury attending camps every single weekend. Over the years I have seen many really good players pull a hamstring or a quad because they attend too many camps. You have to have a plan for your summer. If you finishing your junior year, it is vital you have a plan. You have one shot to earn a scholarship. 
    First, make list of schools who you have actually talked to. Then, find out when those schools are offering camps. Put those camp dates on a calendar. Look at your school workout schedule. if there are dates where a camp is offered when you don't have workouts, that is a camp you want to attend. See which camps are offered in close proximity and similar similar dates. If you are traveling over 2 hours to go to camp, try to find a couple of camps you can attend in that area. You might go to one camp on a Friday, and another on a Saturday. You can also set up campus visits when you attend camps. While there aren't a lot of students on campus, this gives you an opportunity to see the campus of a school you are interested in. 

Prepare For The Camp
    The first time you run a 40 should not be at camp. Make sure you are attending summer workouts for your own team. In addition to working hard in the weight room, make sure you are working on your speed and agility. Don't go into camp without being prepared to have a great performance. Over the years I have seen a number of guys go to camp as a prospect, and leave as a suspect. I have seen guys at the top of the board end up off the recruiting board because of a bad camp performance. Make sure you are prepared. 

Camps Are An Audition
    Camps are your chance to audition for college coaches. It is your opportunity to show the coaching staff that you have the ability to play at their school. Do you have the measurables they require? Do you have the athletic ability they are looking for? Do you have the right mindset and attitude to be a championship player? Everything you do at camp will be evaluated. Treat the camp as a business trip. You are not there to clown around and make friends. You are there to make an impression. 

Camps Are Important
    If you don't attend camps, you are going to reduce your chances of earning a scholarship. If a school tells your high school coach they really like you, but they need to evaluate you at camp before they will offer you, go to the camp. Over the years I have seen many athletes wonder why they are being "slept on" when they didn't go to any camps. Colleges won't recruit you if they don't know who you are. And just having a good film is not enough. You need to go to camps, and it is important you make sure you go to the right camps. 

Don't Wait Until You Are A Junior
    Go to camps after your 9th, 10th, and 11th grade year. You want to get exposure as early as you can. Going to camp as a 9th grader will help you not only in getting exposure now, but it gets you familiar with camps as you develop. The earlier you can get experience and exposure, the better. 

Final Thoughts
    I do not want to discourage you, but I want you to be able to make the most of your camp experience. If you want to earn a college scholarship, then you need to go to camps. Make sure you go to the right camps for your recruitment. If you are a 6'0 225 pound offensive lineman, you need to go to D3 and NAIA camps. If you have FBS measurables but no offers, go to an FCS camp, an FBS camp, and a couple of D2 camps. Make sure you have a camp plan, and prepare for the camps you are going to attend. Treat it like a business trip, and compete in every drill. Be coachable, and listen as you are being coached. Do everything you can do to be a guy that coach could see himself coaching for the next four years. 

If you want to learn more and are serious about earning a scholarship...

To help you navigate the recruiting process, I put together a course on CoachTube. This course has over 6 hours of instruction to go along with numerous downloadable resources for you. The course teaches you everything you need to do to earn a college scholarship, including the academic requirements. Thousands of athletes miss out on scholarships each year because they make key mistakes. I don't want that to be you. I cover everything from using social media, to building a perfect highlight film, to building a recruiting plan. 

In this course I also give you hacks and tips that show you ways to set yourself apart at camp. I teach you what to do before, during, and after each camp you attend to maximize your opportunity to earn a scholarship offer. 

Right now, you can save 50% if you use this link to order the course: https://coachtube.com/course/football/how-to-win-the-recruiting-process-and-earn-an-athletic-scholarship/14034333?cpnCode=SigningDay&track=d0e2cfee516fba3945d97167f5c3f680 There are a limited number of these coupons available, so sign up now. Everyone who has gone through the course says it has made an immediate impact on their recruiting! I took my recruiting seminar and put it all together into one program. 

You will get lifetime access to all the materials in this course! You will get 24 hour access to watch the videos. That way, you can watch at your convenience. 


This course has literally everything you need as a parent or prospect to greatly improve your changes of earning a scholarship! I take you the entire process, teaching you what you need to do, and how you need to do it. I educate you on some very important details that will help you to better navigate the entire recruiting process! Click the link to get your discount, and improve your chances of earning a scholarship. 

Additional Resources for Coaches:

Last year I got hooked up with CoachTube, and put together three courses for offensive football coaches. I put together two courses on RPO's, and a course on Building An Elite System of Communication. All of these courses will help you to score more points! 

https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint





All three of these courses are detailed, with everything you need to be more explosive and to score more points. 

The course on communication gives you a detailed approach to your gameday communication. I give you a system and a process to improve the quality of conversations, leading to improved play calling on game day. This course has received outstanding reviews from coaches at all level of football. A coach with multiple state titles told me this course helped them to be much more efficient and explosive this season. 

My two RPO courses take you through a systematic process of installing RPO's into your offensive system. RPO's put the defense in conflict, forcing them to defend all 53 yards of width and all 6 skill players every single play. I not only give you a system, but I teach you the methods to develop your own RPO concepts. 

https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint



Additional Resources

A few years ago I was speaking at a clinic about our game planning and an FBS coordinator asked me after the talk to go through what we do. I shared with him our offensive game planning resource and he used it through the spring. He emailed me back that it was a game changer. It was an honor to have him use these documents. After speaking at clinics and hearing that more coaches didn't know where to start, I decided to make these available.

Here is a link to my offensive game planning documents: https://sellfy.com/p/AndN/ 
It includes everything from a scouting report template, to practice plans, to a two-sided color call sheet, and more! Each of the nine documents are fully editable and customizable! Order today and start preparing for your first game right now! At one time this was $99, but it is available right now for less than $13!
Here are a couple of screen shots to show you what our call sheet looks like: 

This shows you a small portion of it. It is a fully editable, customizable two sided call sheet. It gives you the ability to better organize and be prepared on game day. It helped us to be better play callers on game day. There are eight other fully customizable documents! Some of the top high school programs in the country use this, as do several college programs!

When I was a defensive coordinator we adapted this to our defensive preparation! 
Here is a link to the defensive game planning documents. It includes 12 fully editable and customizable documents. https://sellfy.com/p/AY1u/ These are what we used to post 6 shutouts when I was a defensive coordinator. Defensive coordinators at all levels of football are using this. Again, it is less than $13 right now!

And finally, I put together a special teams resource. This has everything you need, included drill tape, practice tape, and game footage. It includes teaching presentations and scouting forms just for special teams! https://sellfy.com/p/tJwz/ This helped us to build dominating special teams! 

I wanted these to be available at a very reasonable cost. These can help you to be more successful on the field and more efficient in the office! 

Over the last several months, I have stepped out of my comfort zone and wrote a new book about faith and purpose. The book is available as a paperback on Amazon, and as an eBook for the Kindle App. The cool thing about the Kindle app is that you can read the book on any device. I invite you to read it, and discover the power you receive when you make a decision to walk with the Lord. Here is a link to the book: Finding Faith

Since publishing the book, I have received numerous texts, calls, and emails, from people who are going through similar trials and tribulations. They were feeling many of the same things I was feeling. The found comfort in the book. They also found they had a desire to change and to live better. They wanted more joy. 

I would invite you to read the book and discover the possibilities that God has planned for your life.



Tuesday, May 4, 2021

4 Keys To Getting An Athletic Scholarship

For most of my coaching career I have been heavily involved in recruiting. I have been a high school recruiting coordinator for over 17 years, helping our athletes to get recruited. I also coached at the college level, where I evaluated and recruited student athletes. Over the years I have directed camps and showcases, and hosted recruiting seminars for parents, prospects, and coaches. 

Recruiting is ever-changing. It never stays the same. But one thing remains unchanged. It is competitive. There will be over $3.6 Billion in athletic scholarships given by NCAA schools this year, and another $500 million or so given by NAIA schools and junior colleges. Only 2% of high school athletes will earn any sort of scholarship. Most scholarships are going to be partial, but regardless of the amount, can help make college more affordable. 

How do you get recruited? How do you become one of those 2%. What does it take for you to earn an athletic scholarship? There are four things that parents and prospects must know when it comes to scholarships. 

1. You have to be talented
    
    If you do not have talent, you most likely will not be recruited. This is important to understand. Coaches need to have a reason to recruit you before they will do so. What do you do that no one else can do? If you don't separate yourself, your recruiting will be limited. Before you can earn an athletic scholarship, you have to be a very talented player. Can the college coach see you having the ability to help them win more games? Talent is often measured based on your film. 

2. You have to have the measurables
   
    Recruiting is a lot like a beauty contest. If you run a modeling agency, it doesn't matter how good someone can walk, if they don't have beauty, you won't hire them. This is how measurables work. If you are the best offensive linemen in your state, but you are 5'11," your chances of being recruited are slim. If you are 6'6" and 275 pounds, you will get interest based solely on your size. 
    There are certain measurables that college coaches are looking for at each position. For some schools, not meeting their measurables means they will not offer you a scholarship. They are going to look at your height, weight, wingspan, shoe size, hand size, body type, and more. Again, how are you going to set yourself apart? The better your measurables, the better your chance at a scholarship. If you don't have the measurables, it makes it harder to earn a scholarship. 

3. You have to gain exposure

    No one will recruit you who doesn't know who you are. You have to get your name in front of college coaches. You have to attend camps and showcases. One of the biggest myths in recruiting is that if you are really good, coaches will find you. This simply isn't the case. There are literally thousands of really, really talented athletes who don't get recruited each year, that are good enough to play. They aren't getting recruited because no one knows who they are. 
    When you make a decision that you want to play college sports, you have to immediately begin to put your name out there. You have to be willing to do the leg work to get yourself known. If you come from an elite high school program, coaches might find you. But if you are like most kids who come from less well-known programs, you have to be very proactive. Reach out to college coaches. Go on their website and fill out their questionnaires. Go to camps and showcases. Use Social Media. There are so many things that you can do right now. If you want to be recruited you have to be willing to get your name out there. Just like in sales, the more contacts you make, the more chance you have of someone being interested in you. 
4. You have to have good grades. 

    The first thing a college coach asks for is your transcript. If you have below a 3.0 GPA, you are sabotaging yourself. The number of schools who can recruit you is reduced every tenth of a point your GPA falls. Every time you get a zero on an assignment, you sabotage yourself. 
    Getting good grades starts with being in class, and being there on-time. Second, you put your phone away and look at the teacher. Listen to them and take notes. Then, complete your classwork in class. Never say, "I'll do it at home" when the teacher gives you time to work on things in class. And when you do get homework, do it. Homework should be the first thing you do when you get home. Don't turn on the game system or FaceTime your girlfriend until your homework is done. 
    If you are struggling in class, go to tutorials. Your teachers will help you. Someone right now is reading this and saying, "but my teacher won't help me, she's mean to me when I ask for help." That may be true. It might be because your teacher is mean. Or, it might be because you haven't put forth much effort in class, and the teacher wants you to work harder. If the teacher doesn't like you, ask yourself what you need to do to change. Most likely, you have done some unlikable things. College coaches don't want to recruit guys that aren't going to do well in school. And if your GPA is too low, they can't recruit you. It is vital you do well in school. 
    Part of having good grades is knowing what your core GPA is. Your core GPA is not your overall GPA. Your core GPA is based on your math, English, science, social studies, and foreign language courses you take in high school. These courses must be on your school's 48H form. If you don't know what this form is, see your counselor. It lists every NCAA approved core course offered by your high school. I have seen kids lose scholarships because they took courses that didn't count towards the NCAA core course requirement. 
    
   There are many more keys than just these four things, but these four things provide you a foundation to earn a scholarship. 

To help you navigate the recruiting process, I put together a course on CoachTube. This course has over 6 hours of instruction to go along with numerous downloadable resources for you. The course teaches you everything you need to do to earn a college scholarship, including the academic requirements. Thousands of athletes miss out on scholarships each year because they make key mistakes. I don't want that to be you. I cover everything from using social media, to building a perfect highlight film. 


There are a limited number of these coupons available, so sign up now. Everyone who has gone through the course says it has made an immediate impact on their recruiting!

You will get lifetime access to all the materials in this course! You will get 24 hour access to watch the videos. That way, you can watch at your convenience. 


This course has literally everything you need as a parent or prospect to greatly improve your changes of earning a scholarship! I take you the entire process, teaching you what you need to do, and how you need to do it. I educate you on some very important details that will help you to better navigate the entire recruiting process! Click the link to get your discount, and improve your chances of earning a scholarship. 

  

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

The Return of the Fullback

Football has gone through many evolutions and cycles over the last 152 years since Rutgers and New Jersey (Now Princeton) squared off in the first known American Football game. Every year there are new wrinkles and fads. I have found, however, that even though there are new wrinkles, nearly everything is built off a foundation that comes from the early years of the game. You still find teams today running the single wing, which carries roots into the early years of football. On the other side you have teams that run the air raid, where the throw the football all over the field. 

One of the great parts about the game today is how diverse it is. While the game is ever-changing, it also stays the same in foundation. Regardless of what system you run on offense, the game comes down to blocking, ball security, and explosive plays. And defensively, it comes down to lining up right, playing fast, and tackling. 

The Return of the Fullback

One thing I love about football today is that two back formations have been making a comeback. In the early 2000's, many teams began to run the "spread." Spread is a broad term, but we saw more athletes on the field and less tight ends. You had the quarterback in the shotgun instead of being under center. Over the last 10 years or so, we have seen more and more teams starting to bring back tight ends and fullbacks. The fullback is a lost art in football. 

The fullback is essentially a 6th blocker in the game. If you can find a fullback who has dynamic talents where he can run and catch, you have something special. Back in the late 90's when we faced several wing-t teams each year, the key to the offense was the fullback. We used to say, "if we can stop the fullback trap and belly, we will be okay." The better the fullback, the tougher teams were to defend. 

In our own offense in the late 90's, we were based in the I. The key for our success was our fullback. Our fullback had to be able to block, catch, and run the football. We wanted a big guy with some speed. The biggest key, however, was their physicality. They had to be able to kick out an end, lead up on a linebacker, and break tackles on our option concepts. The more physical they were, the better we would be. Defenses began to load the box to take the run. We used option concepts to read defenders and gain a numerical advantage. One key to a successful run game is being able to equate numbers in the box. 

Today we are seeing teams in the shotgun using an H back like a fullback. Sometimes, they call him a sniffer back. He is leading up on linebackers, kicking out ends, and running pass routes. Offenses also move the fullback and tailback around, creating opportunities to get change the numbers. The one difference is that the "new" fullbacks are not going to get as may carries in the run game as they would under center. Offenses have also taken "option" football to another level, reading first, second, and third level defenders. 

One advantage in the shotgun, is that you can borrow your fullback to change numbers much easier than you can when under center. When you are under center, you have to run a slower developing play to bring the fullback across the formation. In the gun, you can have your fullback work immediately across the formation, changing gap fits. 

In the figure below, the offense has lined up the fullback and tailback stacked away from the Tight End. this forces the defense to have to defend 5 gaps away from the TE, and 4 gaps to the TE. The fullback can also work across the formation, meaning the defense has to defend an extra gap strong. Essentially, create a 5th gap to the tight end side. 

The defense now must decide how they will defend the extra gap away from the tight end, while still accounting for the F "swiping" across the formation. If the QB is a runner, there now are two lead blockers for the quarterback away from, or to the tight end. The defense must have an answer to be able to get a hat in each gap, and block up both blockers. With a running QB, this puts the defense into a numbers deficiency. 

In the figure above, the quarterback is running the sweep play, with the F and the T leading to the edge. The first back can account for the playside linebacker, with the T accounting for the secondary force support player. Even if the defense rolls down, the offense has a hat for a hat. The offense can further create a numbers problem by running jet sweep with the Z. The QB can now read a defender. 

In the figure above, the offense is running jet sweep with the Z receiver, while reading the backside defensive tackle. The backside of the run will lock the 5 and 9 techniques. The center and BSG will climb to track the backside backer. The center is checking for a playside A gap run through. Even with the secondary rotating, the offense has a numbers advantage. The QB reads the backsside DT. If he chases, the QB pulls and replaces. This gives you a midline element to your jet sweep. When you motion the Z receiver, you have essentially just motioned back into a 3 back set. 

You could essentially run buck sweep from this same look. Now you gain an additional hat with the pull of the backside guard. The playside tackle blocks down, while the F logs the 5 technique. The 5 must squeeze when he gets a downblock. This gives the offense access to the edge. The first puller kicks the alley runner. The T is responsible for the playside inside backer. The backside puller is responsible for the alley runner. 

If the backside inside backer flows fast and flies mirroring the puller, you can either read him for a pull read, or you can read him for an RPO to the TE. The RPO is illustrated in the picture below. 

While this looks like it is complex, it is essentially a football play that has been run for 120 years in some form or fashion. Your QB run or backside RPO replaces the trap fake to hold the backside. 

The figure above shows buck sweep in the wing T. You can see that in the gun, we have used the stacked backs to create the 4 man surface to run buck sweep. The concept is the exact same. You are trying to gain a numbers advantage while creating leverage. The nuance added today is the RPO element backside. 

In addition to variations of jet sweep and buck sweep, we are seeing the Isolation play making a comeback. More and more teams are using their sniffer to lead up on the playside inside linebacker. You are just seeing coaches adding some window dressing to slow down defensive pursuit. 

The figure above illustrates the isolation play with orbit motion from the Z. The fullback is going to isolate the playside backer, just like he would from a splitback or the I formation under center. More and more coaches are also faking jet sweep to run the isolation play away from jet action. This slows down defensive pursuit. 

It is exciting to see the fullback position being utilized more and more by offenses at all levels. While the game evolves, the foundational football plays remain the same. The creativity comes in the presentation of these tried and true concepts. This is just a small example of some things people are doing as they bring back 21 personnel. 

We talk a lot of ball on twitter as well. Follow me @coachvint

Additional Resources

A few years ago I was speaking at a clinic about our game planning and an FBS coordinator asked me after the talk to go through what we do. I shared with him our offensive game planning resource and he used it through the spring. He emailed me back that it was a game changer. It was an honor to have him use these documents. After speaking at clinics and hearing that more coaches didn't know where to start, I decided to make these available.

Here is a link to my offensive game planning documents: https://sellfy.com/p/AndN/ 
It includes everything from a scouting report template, to practice plans, to a two-sided color call sheet, and more! Each of the nine documents are fully editable and customizable! Order today and start preparing for your first game right now! At one time this was $99, but it is available right now for less than $13!
Here are a couple of screen shots to show you what our call sheet looks like: 

This shows you a small portion of it. It is a fully editable, customizable two sided call sheet. It gives you the ability to better organize and be prepared on game day. It helped us to be better play callers on game day. There are eight other fully customizable documents! Some of the top high school programs in the country use this, as do several college programs!

When I was a defensive coordinator we adapted this to our defensive preparation! 
Here is a link to the defensive game planning documents. It includes 12 fully editable and customizable documents. https://sellfy.com/p/AY1u/ These are what we used to post 6 shutouts when I was a defensive coordinator. Defensive coordinators at all levels of football are using this. Again, it is less than $13 right now!

And finally, I put together a special teams resource. This has everything you need, included drill tape, practice tape, and game footage. It includes teaching presentations and scouting forms just for special teams! https://sellfy.com/p/tJwz/ This helped us to build dominating special teams! 

I wanted these to be available at a very reasonable cost. These can help you to be more successful on the field and more efficient in the office! 

 Last year I got hooked up with CoachTube, and put together three courses for offensive football coaches. I put together two courses on RPO's, and a course on Building An Elite System of Communication. All of these courses will help you to score more points! 

https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint





All three of these courses are detailed, with everything you need to be more explosive and to score more points. 

The course on communication gives you a detailed approach to your gameday communication. I give you a system and a process to improve the quality of conversations, leading to improved play calling on game day. This course has received outstanding reviews from coaches at all level of football. A coach with multiple state titles told me this course helped them to be much more efficient and explosive this season. 

My two RPO courses take you through a systematic process of installing RPO's into your offensive system. RPO's put the defense in conflict, forcing them to defend all 53 yards of width and all 6 skill players every single play. I not only give you a system, but I teach you the methods to develop your own RPO concepts. 

https://coachtube.com/users/coachvint


If you want to learn more about installing RPO's, I wrote a book called Installing Explosive RPO Concepts Into Any Offense. I wrote it for iBooks, which includes cut-ups to reinforce the application of these concepts. In the book I give you a systematic process for installing 2nd and 3rd level RPO's. Coaches at all level of football tell me this is a game changer! The book can be found for iBooks here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959


The iBooks version can be viewed on any iPhone, Mac, or iPad. It is a game changer in book technology! This book will give you everything you need to build RPO's into your offense!

If you don't have an apple device, you can order the paperback version! It is available on Amazon!
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1520447485

Follow me @coachvint on Twitter and Instagram! I am also working on two new book projects, as well as a podcast. If there is anything I can do, please let me know. 

Over the last several months, I have stepped out of my comfort zone and wrote a new book about faith and purpose. The book is available as a paperback on Amazon, and as an eBook for the Kindle App. The cool thing about the Kindle app is that you can read the book on any device. I invite you to read it, and discover the power you receive when you make a decision to walk with the Lord. Here is a link to the book: Finding Faith

Since publishing the book, I have received numerous texts, calls, and emails, from people who are going through similar trials and tribulations. They were feeling many of the same things I was feeling. The found comfort in the book. They also found they had a desire to change and to live better. They wanted more joy. 

I would invite you to read the book and discover the possibilities that God has planned for your life.

Let Me Help Your Organization
Over the last 20 years I have traveled throughout the country speaking to teams and organizations. I have worked with some of the top high school and college programs in the nation, and have also spoken to business leaders and leaders in the classroom as well. If can help your organization build an elite culture while increasing the footprint of the impact you are having. If there is a need, please reach out to me and I will tailor a program to fit your needs.