Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Building Championship Culture


A few years ago I spoke at the Glazier Clinic in Atlantic City about building championship culture, and out of all of the clinic talks I have done, that is the one that has had the biggest response. I love the X's and O's of coaching, but my favorite aspect is the opportunity for young people to accomplish goals that others think are unattainable. Coaching is not a career as much as a calling. We have an opportunity to change lives each day.  I hope there is something here you can use.

In my 19 years of coaching, I have not had a job yet where we came into a place that had a championship culture. Everywhere I have been has been an opportunity to turn a program around. At each place we faced the same enemies: Complacency, apathy, and an acceptance of mediocrity. 

At Columbus High School in the Bronx, we took a program that had never had a winning season, never been to the post season, and was in the midst of a 27 game losing streak, and turned the program into a perennial playoff contender.  How did we change the culture? First, is understanding that the smallest details make the biggest difference. We focused on making sure we took care of the seemingly insignificant details. We did not ever focus on what we didn’t have. We focused on ourselves first. We didn’t worry about what our opponents were doing. We had no control over them. What we did have total control over was what we did each day.


The first thing we did was talk to them about the why. This is why we are going to coach you on this. This is why we have to do it this way. Kids today need to know “why” something is done a certain way. Once they understand the why, they will buy into the what and the how.

Each day we had the weight room set up a certain way. We had the racks in a certain spot. We had the plates organized a certain way. We set a standard of performance and held them accountable. We held them accountable for their lockers, and their locker room. If we said your t-shirt hangs on the right hook and your shorts are on the left, that’s where we expected them to be. If they weren’t, we retrained and reminded them.  


When you build culture, the expectations have to be clear and concise. When we stood in line, or were in front of the coaches, we had clear expectations. We stand with our eyes and chin up, chest spread, and hands behind our back. When we take a knee, we will put our left knee down with our hands on our right knee. That is the expectation. There was no exception.


I learned a great deal from our head coach, David Diaz, about setting high expectations and not succumbing to mediocrity. We had a certain way we set the field up, and a time frame. 15 minutes after the bell we started our agility circuit. The field had to be set up, and every athlete had to be at their assigned station. The whistle would blow, and we would begin. Our kids had the responsibility of field set-up. One Wednesday before a huge game, the field wasn’t set up correctly. The sled wasn’t dressed, and some bags were not set up, and a couple of kids straggled out late. Coach Diaz brought everyone together and told the players to break the field down and put everything away. They looked bewildered. But they did as told. After they put everything away we met in the locker room. He told everyone they had 5 minutes to set the field up correctly.


The players moved frantically to set the field. However, a few of them let their attitude get twisted up and they straggled. It took 5 minutes and 14 seconds to finish the field. They didn’t meet the five minute standard. We spent the entire practice setting up and breaking down the field. After several attempts, the field was finally set up correctly and on time.  We practiced for about ten minutes total before we had to let them go.


When the coaching staff got upstairs I was livid. We scripted everything in practice, and we obviously couldn't get through much of what we had planned. Coach Diaz let me stew for a few minutes, and when I had gotten it out, he gave me a great lesson. Our X’s and O’s won’t matter if we can’t even get the field set up. If we can’t meet simple expectations like setting the field up, how are we going to beat a state ranked team on Friday Night? How are we going to line up right with bullets flying if we can't get a rack put in the right place. It all matters. These little details matter.


Attention to details is what sets apart consistent success. When you parallel squat, are your athletes getting to parallel? Or are they cutting corners? Are you allowing them to cut corners? Do you have a definition of parallel that is clear and concise? Are you willing to hold kids accountable to reaching a standard?


If you are teaching a six inch zone step to your offensive line, do you accept a 4 inch step? When you are teaching a 10 yard stop route, do you accept and eight yard route? Or, do you correct and reteach? Do your players know why you have to get to 10 yards on that route? Do they know “why” they have to perform the skill?


If you want consistent and sustained success, everyone on your staff has to be willing to hold kids accountable to meeting your standard each and every day. It’s hard. It is very, very hard. You can’t decide that today it is okay to do it 90% right. You can’t let it slip. When we broke out to begin an activity, or transition from one activity to another, we asked them to hustle. We showed them what it looks like. We modeled it. Then, we held them accountable. There were occasions when guys didn’t hustle. It didn’t meet our standard. What do you do?


Are you willing to accept less than what your standard is? When I was a young coach, I didn’t want to distract from the weight room or practice field for these “little things.” However, once you let them slip, it is hard to get them back. It is harder to get them back than it is to simply teach it right the first time. What we did was send them back with specific instructions, and ask them to do it again to our standard. If they met our standard, we moved on. If not, we would do it again, and again. We would sometimes have to stop and reteach the why.


Columbus had been mired in mediocrity for years. They expected to lose, so everything they did was going to lead to losing. They had the “why should we work hard if we are just going to lose” syndrome.  Many programs, after years of losing, find themselves with this very culture.


We evaluated the program and found the weakest three areas. First, the strength and conditioning program was terrible. Second, numbers were very, very low. Third, the equipment was old and dilapidated.


We focused on improving those three areas, using the strength and conditioning program to be a catalyst for the cultural shift.  Our players needed to learn stretch themselves. They needed to learn that they could do much more than they thought possible. We recorded everything they did in the weight room. They kept record cards we got from B-F-S so they could see their progress. When we started we had 2 kids that squatted 300 pounds. By our fourth year, every varsity player squatted 300 pounds, and a dozen parallel squatted 450.  We are not talking about a half squat. We are talking about truly getting the thigh parallel to the ground.


In addition to getting stronger, we were able to teach mental toughness. We gave them a definition: Mental Toughness: The ability to face adversity, failure, and negative events, without a loss of effort, attitude, and enthusiasm.  We also started to put together a leadership development and character education curriculum. We took some of D.W. Rutledge and Dennis Parker’s Coaching to Change Lives and began teaching it with our players. We talked about each day being an opportunity. Do you “have to,” or do you “get to.” You can’t relive today. You only get one shot. What are you going to do with it? Are you willing to make the most of it, without exception?


As mentioned above, we made sure our focus was on being the best “we” that we could be. We didn’t worry much about who we played or what they were or were not. We focused on being our best each day. We helped them to develop their attitude, and taught them the impact a great attitude would have on their success. Three things you completely control are your attitude, effort, and enthusiasm. Ninety percent of your success in any endeavor is your attitude at the beginning.


Think about teams that are struggling. They believe they will lose, and their attitude reflects this. What happens? They put forth mediocre effort and lose. We knew the scoreboard would be a tough place to win in the beginning. We need to have some small victories to build on, so we used John Wooden’s definition of success.  “Success is peace of mind of knowing you did your very best, to be the very best that you could be.” At the end of the day we would use this definition to evaluate whether we “won the day.”


All of a sudden, our kids started to believe in themselves and each other. We started seeing them take ownership. Another very valuable exercise we did was have them come up with goals for the season. They listed practice and weight room goals, and set their own standards of performance.  We also asked them to consider their identity. If someone came to watch you workout, how would they describe you? What would they say if they saw you in the classroom? What do you think championship effort would look like?

Once it became their deal, and they became vested in the program, the culture began to shift. They began to lead each other, and be accountable to each other. We asked them to hold each other accountable, and take over the role of leading.

You get what you emphasize! If you emphasize hustle, that is what you will get. If you don't put an emphasis on something, don't expect it to happen. 


There is no simple answer or magic pill to change culture. It is a constant, on-going process. You must be willing to pay attention to the seemingly insignificant details that most would choose to overlook. In addition, here are some important points:

1.  Set High Standards
2.      Clearly Define Expecations
3.      Explain the Why
4.      Teach them how to meet the standard
5.      Hold them accountable
6.      Reteach if standard is not met
7.      Build on small success
8.      Value Hard Work
9.      Teach Leadership with INTENT
10. Have a great Attitude
11.  Give Great Effort
12. Always be enthusiastic

The most important aspect of consistently successful football programs is the attention to seemingly insignificant details. If you want to be successful on the field, you have to take care of the little things. If we say to stand with your eyes up and your hands behind your back, you should stand exactly that way. If we tell you to hustle from point A to point B, you need to hustle from point A to point B. There can be no exceptions. If we don't do it right, we are going to do it again until we do it correctly.


Self Discipline: Do what you are supposed to do, when you are supposed to do it, the way it is supposed to be done, regardless of circumstance or how you feel! This goes for players and coaches. We must give our best effort every single day in the weightroom, meeting room, on the field, and in the classroom. We must make the effort to correct behavior that doesn't meet our standard of performance.

Finally, every day keep working to help kids grow. Make sure you are always moving forward. Evaluate, learn, grow, and keep moving. I hope there is something you can take from this post and use in your program! Please let me know if there is anything I can do!

A few months back I published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense. I
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here:

Friday, February 15, 2013

Pistol Zone Read- Accounting for Gap Exchange

Two Tracking Two

One concept we like on offense is the concept of two offensive players tracking two defensive players. This is a very important concept in our option game from the pistol and offset look from the gun. When we started running the zone read in 1999, defenses were vanilla in how they defended us. By 2003 and 2004, however, defensive coordinators started to cloud the read for the quarterback.

The favorite stunt we would see was the defensive end running the heel line, while the read side inside linebacker would work the C gap. Typically this stunt was run when we got a one technique and a 5 technique to the side we set our back. The first time we saw this our quarterback got hit in the mouth. The defensive end running the heel line gave the quarterback a pull read. It was frustrating for the quarterback as he was doing exactly what he had been coached to do. 


Our staff sat down the following Sunday and began to look for solutions.  Little did we know the answer was already in our playbook. Because we had been running midline with great success for several years, we had seen a similar gap exchange from the Mike LB and the 3 technique. The 3 technique would squeeze the release of the guard, while the Mike would work over the top into the B gap. To counter this we had a second player tracking the Mike linebacker.

We got on the white board and started looking at how we could make the same concept work with our zone read game. We ended up with a simple concept that could work with any of our zone read concepts, as well as our inside veer play. We would use a second player to track the playside linebacker, along with our read side offensive tackle.

Our read side tackle and our bonus player would both have their eyes on the playside linebacker. If the playside linebacker stepped up in the B gap, the tackle would block him. The second player tracking the playside backer would climb to the next most dangerous man. 

If the playside linebacker scraped outside, the second player tracking the PSLB would block him, while the tackle would work to the next most dangerous man.  

In addition, we also turned our inside zone read into a triple option by adding a pitch phase. From our 2x2 look our inside receiver would be our pitch man. This keeps the defense from rolling a safety down to play the quarterback. They must honor the pitch phase. 

Here is a clip of this two track two concept in action with a pitch phase.



In the clip, our second player tracking the read side backer took a poor angle and got leveraged by the safety. Instead of a 25 yard gain, we settled for a 9 yard gain.

Here is another example, where our playside tackle gets a body on the side backer, and the Y climbs to the safety. The triple option aspect forced the defense to play assignment football.


As we expanded and grew our pistol offense, we were able to be creative with the alignment of the second player tracking the read side backer.  Any of our skill players could be the second player tracking the playside linebacker. We could align them in the backfield, or as a wing or slot to or away from the read side. In the picture below, the F is aligned in a slot and works across the formation to work with the read side tackle to account for the playside inside linebacker.

 A lot of coaches ask if he gets in the way of the pistol back. The only way this happens is if he doesn't hustle on the snap.

Below is the back aligned in the backfield becoming the second player tracking the read side backer.

Another rule we added was that our read side tackle blocked anything that crossed his face. If the read player crossed his face, we blocked him. Instead of determining our read pre-snap, we told our QB to read the C gap player, after the snap.




As defenses began to catch-up with the zone read, we had to adjust how we read the C gap. Sometimes we would get three players moving on the read side, and the quarterback had to be drilled to make a post snap determination of who his read is.


We must differentiate when we need to have a second player tracking the playside backer. If we are getting a slant across the tackle's face, the tackle would block him and the QB adjusts his read to the C gap player. If C gap player runs the heel line, we want to get a second player tracking the PSLB to account for the gap exchange.

I hope there is something you can use from this blog post. These are ideas you may want to consider if teams like to gap exchange your read game. 

If you are looking for more information on the two tracking two concept, check out 101 Pistol Option Plays. It is available on Amazon and from Coaches Choice. The ebook is only available here:

Also, published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense.
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here:
Follow me on Twitter: Coach Vint's Twitter Page

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Pistol Evolution


In the Beginning

Back about ten years ago we lined up in the pistol for the first time, little did we know what we were embarking upon. We were running some zone read from the gun and people were playing games on the side we set our back. There were some real tendencies we were trying to overcome. We set our back behind the quarterback and found we were able to run our inside zone read game, just as we had with the back offset. By the time 2006 rolled around, we were in the pistol full-time.

In our eyes, there were two distinct advantages to the pistol. The first was that we could run our zone read game without the defense knowing which side would be the side we were reading. The second advantage was the fact that we were able to run all of our downhill run concepts from the pistol. Finally, our quarterback had depth in the pass game.

The biggest advantage to being in the pistol was balance. When we were under center we didn’t throw the ball often… or very effectively. Because of this, we routinely faced 8 and nine man fronts. When we got into the gun, we were able to spread people out. We were able to take some pressure off of our offensive lineman.

The defense has loaded the box. The safety is only 6 yards away from the LOS!


The Gun Spread the Defense Out- FS now at 12 yards


Because our quarterback already had depth, we were able to protect better. Our quarterbacks were able to throw the ball better. They were more comfortable. All of a sudden we had balance. Because we had balance, we ran the ball more effectively.

In the 90’s we were based out of the I. We ran midline, load veer, iso, toss, trap, inside zone, counter, and power. We chose 6 to 7 of these concepts to run each year, depending on personnel. We were consistently one of the top rushing teams in the area. In 1999 we were introduced to the zone read by Jerry Campbell, who was the offensive coordinator at Westwood High School just outside of Austin, Texas. Forever our world was changed. 

During this same time, we met a young, energetic coach from a small college up North. Chip Kelly was recruiting for New Hampshire, and was on the forefront of the zone read game. He had some ideas that were way ahead of their time. Over the next couple of years we began to incorporate the gun zone read into our offense. By 2002, we were in the gun about 50% of the time. However, we were still getting under center to run midline, iso, veer, toss, and trap. We were running our zone read concepts from the gun.

We thought we were diverse, as teams had to prepare for our gun based offense, and out I based offense. What we learned from talking to our opponents is that we were very easy to defend because of our tendencies. They defended our I formation offense one way, and our gun based offense another way. We also were essentially running two distinct systems, which did not allow for efficiency in practice. We needed to find a way to run the best of the three worlds we were living in.

Enter the Pistol

While we had dabbled in the pistol previously, it was in 2005 and 2006 that we figured out some things we can do with the pistol. I had a tremendous offensive line coach, Chris Harris. During spring football, we were putting the back behind the QB to run our zone read concepts. We used both one and two back looks. We were at the end of spring practice when we fumbled a bunch of snaps under center. We told our QB to stay at 5 yards. We had our F line up at 4 yards behind the right guard. Our tailback was lined up behind the Q. We snapped the ball to the QB, who turned and gave the ball to the tailback. We were running traditional Iso from the pistol.

From there, we ran inside veer. We started running it with the offset back running the dive path. Then, we evolved to running inside veer with the pistol back being the dive back. Next, we ran traditional power. Then, counter trey. All of a sudden, we were able to marry our spread run game, option game, and our traditional downhill run game from the pistol. We no longer had to get under center.


Over the last 9 years, I have helped several schools install the spread and pistol offenses. Each school I have helped has done things differently. That is the great thing about this game. You can take tried and true concepts and make them your own. It has been a lot of fun to see how guys have taken different concepts and adapted them to the pistol. 

The weekend of March 1st I will be speaking at the Nike Clinic in Oregon to talk about our Pistol Offense. I will be speaking on Marrying the Downhill Run Game and the Spread with the Pistol, and Installing the Quick Pass Game from the Pistol. If you are heading to the clinic, stop by and say hello. 

When I first started speaking on the pistol at clinics in 2006 and 2007, I would have small crowds. Most of them were curious, but they just couldn't grasp the concept of the back being behind the QB in the gun. Last year, I had over 500 coaches in one session. With the success of some NFL teams bringing more exposure to the pistol, I am excited to see how much the interest has increased.

If there is anything I can do to help you with the pistol, shoot me an email. This business is all about coaches helping coaches. We all have begged, borrowed, and stolen from other coaches.

Also, I published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense.
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here:

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Houston Glazier Clinic

I am looking forward to speaking at the Glazier Clinic in Houston, sharing some concepts from the 3-3 Stack defense. We are going to spend three hours going over everything from the structure to attacking specific concepts.


We enjoyed tremendous success running the 3-3 Stack. The two seasons before installing the stack, our defense gave up 38 and 41 ppg. Over the next three seasons, our defense posted 11 shutouts and gave up just 12.2 ppg.

In Houston, I will take you through the inns and outs of the defense. The first hour we will build the structure. The second hour I will show you how to successfully defend different run concepts. In the third hour, we will cover pressure packages that we had tremendous success with!

I hope to see you all at the Glazier Clinic in Houston on Thursday, February 21st, to talk to some football! If you can't make it, I have new video out that you may want to take a look at!


2013 Glazier Schedule

Thursday, Feb. 21
Session I: The 3-3 Stack, Building the Structure: 7pm to 7:50
Session II: The 3-3 Stack, Defending Run Concepts: 8:20pm to 9:10
Session III: The 3-3 Stack, Pressure and Cover Packages to Disrupt the Offense: 9:25pm to 10:15

I hope to see you all in Huston!


Monday, February 4, 2013

Inside Veer Variation 3 Back Pistol

Inside Veer Variation From 3 Back Pistol

If you watched the Superbowl a few years ago, you saw the Niners using some concepts that were similar to some things Nevada did to utilize Colin Kaepernick. These concepts put the defense in conflict, while giving the offense a numerical advantage at the point of attack. Back in 2006 when we went full time to the pistol, the zone read became our base concept. The zone read allowed our kept things very simple for our guys up front, and allowed us to not block one of our opponent's defenders. After installing the zone read, we installed the inside veer. In the pistol, we were able to get a lead blocker for the dive back, essentially turning the inside veer into an iso read play. 

The diagram below shows our inside veer concept with a lead back. The read for the QB is the exact same as inside veer. He is reading the C gap defender. If the C gap defender comes upfield, the QB will give the ball. If the C gap defender squeezes and chases the dive back, the QB will pull the ball and get downhill. 


After installing the Veer Option with a lead back from our two back pistol look, we installed it from the 3 back look. In the 3 back look we are able to create a numbers problem for the defense. Because we are balanced, the defense must balance. Because they must balance, they can't get more than 5 1/2 defenders to either side of the ball. The minute we step off the midpoint, we can get six defenders to the playside. The defense doesn't know if we are reading frontside or backside, causing them further conflict. To give us another blocker, we bring the backside back to lead the ball carrier.

The backside back is key to our success. He is going to read the playside defensive end, the same player the QB is reading. If the playside read squeezes and chase the dive back, the backside back (Y in diagram below) will work off his outside hip and lead the QB. This allows us to handle a gap exchange by the defense. Essentially, we are putting two players on the playside inside backer to backside or middle safety.

If the read player runs upfield, the backside back will work inside the read to block the most dangerous man. This will be the playside inside linebacker, or the backside or middle safety. The diagram below shows the defensive end running upfield.


The pistol allows you to use a backside blocker to account for a frontside defender. This gave us a tremendous opportunity to take advantage of defensive answers for our zone read and veer concepts. If you have a quarterback who is adept at running the ball, this is a great variation you can implement with relative ease.

I also published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense.
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here:




101 Pistol Option Plays

Cover


Table of Contents


Do you want to put your opponent in conflict? Are you looking for innovative ways to score more points? Are you curious about the option game from the pistol? If you answered yes to any or all of these questions, then 101 Pistol Option Plays is for you! Several option concepts are covered, from midline and veer, to the zone read and power read! 101 Pistol Option Plays is available on Coaches Choice and through Amazon!
101 Pistol Option Plays on Amazon
101 Pistol Option Plays on Coaches Choice
If you are looking for the ebook, click on the Coaches Choice link!

I also published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense. I wanted to make it affordable, so it is just $9.99!
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here:

101 Pistol Run Plays

101 Pistol Run Plays

Table of Contents



101 Pistol Run Plays is available through Coaches Choice and on Amazon! If you are thinking about running the pistol offense but don't know where to start, this book will give you a great overview. Several different concepts are described in detail, and 101 Plays are included!
101 Pistol Run Plays on Amazon
101 Pistol Run Plays on Coaches Choice
If you are looking for the ebook click on the Coaches Choice link above!

I also published a couple of iBooks that can help your program with X's and O's. The first is on Installing RPO's into any offense. Here is a link to the iBooks version: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1078061959. The ibooks version includes explanations, diagrams, and video clips on multiple RPO Concepts. It will give you a simple process for implementing them into your offense. I wanted to make it affordable, so it is just $9.99!
If you don't have an iPhone, iPad, or Mac, you can order the Amazon version for the Kindle. It has everything except the embedded video. You can order it here: http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Explosive-Concepts-Into-Offense-ebook/dp/B01B12YSCG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

I also wrote a book on Tempo. It will greatly help you build a multiple tempo system with simple communication that will allow your kids to play with confidence. It also had over an hour of video clips! You can order the ibooks version here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1075902270.


Order the Amazon Kindle version here: